And those who flirt with the entitlement monster lurking in the grey areas between.

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Photo by h heyerlein on Unsplash

Erotic imagery has been around for thousands of years, taking different forms and facing sometimes small sometimes dramatic shifts in cultural attitudes. Sex sells. There is no denying it. The sexual drive is a primal force in our nature and has been since long before our species started walking upright. Brokering sex as a commodity is the ‘oldest profession’ for a reason.

Sexual enticement engages attention, guaranteed. Billboards and photospreads for Calvin Klein underwear are all about the model not the garment. Marilyn Munroe’s rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’ isn’t iconic because of her singing voice. …


One is a freedom, one is a privilege and too much of either can be dangerous.

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Photo by Pop & Zebra on Unsplash

The debates around free speech and whether or not it can or should have boundaries have been around as long as the idea of free speech itself. With the increasing intensity of efforts to confront bigotry and oppression as well as the counter-reacting upsurge in authoritarianism in the past couple of decades the debate has become all the more prominent and important. …


The relationship between art and sex has always been a complicated one.

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Photo by Mat Napo on Unsplash

The sexual drive is a primal force in our species and as such maintains a near omnipresence in our modes of self-expression. Engaging in the time-honored philosophical debate of trying to draw lines between what is considered art, eroticized art, and pornography can be a fascinating, maddening, and ultimate fruitless endeavor. Justice Potter Stewart’s famous 1964 opinion in Jacobellis v. Ohio stating “I know it when I see it” might be as true as it is pithy but it is also ultimately rather unhelpful.

Sexual materials in some form or other have been with us since our earliest recorded histories…


It is simply reveals and shares an existing a difference you might not have known about.

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Photo by Stefan Steinbauer on Unsplash

The term ‘coming out’ has become universally associated with revelations about one’s sexuality, and in recent years one’s gender identity as well. But when you strip it down the core concept it is actually something everyone does in their daily lives on a constant basis, sometimes in large significant ways but often in rather small almost unnoticeable ones.

At its very basest root ‘coming out’ is the emerging of something which was previously concealed. The sun comes out in the morning as the planet…


Understanding the source of a behavior explains the impulse. It does not excuse the actions.

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Photo by Nick Shandra on Unsplash

A crucial part of learning, growing, and reshaping harmful behavior either at the personal or societal level is understanding where the behavior is coming from. It provides context for the behavior, helps us to mitigate our response, and also guides the building of new approaches, habits, and processes to prevent harmful behavior from happening again.

Unfortunately, trying to understand why we do the things we do, or why others do the things they do, can be both one of the most difficult and most important…


Being alert for problems can be helpful but can also become habitual to the point of obsessive.

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Photo by Dapo Abideen on Unsplash

Trouble shooting is an essential skill for growth and development. We cannot overcome troubles if we do not first identify them and any change, either personal or societal, only happens after we recognize then address existing and potential problems. A discerning eye and critical mind are crucial assets but like all good things they can be taken too far eventually becoming problems themselves. Trouble shooting and perpetually finding fault are not the same thing.

Trying to affect any significant social change is a…


Complex problems can be caused all too simply but there are no shortcuts to unravelling them.

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Photo by Lauren McConachie on Unsplash

We are a paradoxical species in many ways but perhaps one of the more perplexing is the ever present war within ourselves between the desire for quick, easy, and simple solutions to our problems and our compulsion for excessively complicating the problems facing us. The first is driven by the natural impulse towards comfort and pleasure. The second is most often born of our quest for a sense of personal importance. Complicating a problem can be done quite simply and easily, solving it cannot.


Convenience is a lovely thing but it can be highly corrosive to our character.

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Photo by rupixen.com on Unsplash

Buy it now. Express shipping. Same-day delivery. Something taking six to eight weeks to arrive is now viewed as a horrendous hardship, relegated only to transactions with the farthest flung corners of the world which can then most often be expedited for an additional cost. It took us a while to get here but the process beginning with industrialized manufacturing has now led to us clicking a button in our living rooms and expecting the package to be on our doorstep within twenty four hours. A…


Freedoms will always have their limits. They have to.

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Photo by Melanie Dretvic on Unsplash

The idea of an absolute freedom is a wonderful concept. It’s the kind of ideal we all instinctively strive for in every aspect of our lives. We want the freedom to eat the foods we prefer, pursue careers we enjoy, spend time with people we like, make it through our days free of physical or emotional pain or threat of harm, to form more intensely personal connections with those we are drawn to, to worship or not as we prefer, to think our own thoughts, to speak our own minds. All…


We are capable of feeling multiple things simultaneously, even about the same subject.

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Photo by Rostyslav Savchyn on Unsplash

We can have a lousy day at a job we love. We can have a great day at a job we hate. We can love the song and loath the musician. We can agree with someone we despise. We can disagree with someone we love. We can love our country and feel it is behaving horribly. Not only are we allowed and able to have several different feelings and opinions about a single object we need to for the sake of our mental health and functioning.

Desiring…

Jeff Fox

A professional dancer, choreographer, theatre creator, and featured TEDx speaker with an honours degree in psychology, two black belts, and a lap-top.

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